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Why Staffing Agencies Shouldn't Share Background or I-9 Information

Why Staffing Agencies Shouldn't Share Background or I-9 Information

 

Staffing agencies jump through hoops to provide their clients with the best, most qualified candidates and stay competitive.  Background checks and drug tests are often essential, and expensive.  These screening tools assure staffing agencies that their candidates are appropriate for placement, but what should staffing agencies do when the client demands more than just a certification of the candidate’s qualifications?

 

Sharing the results of a client’s background check or drug test may seem like an easy way to keep clients happy, but it comes with some serious pitfalls for staffing agencies.  There are three ways that sharing background check or drug test results with clients could put staffing agencies at risk of serious liability.

Bullying in the Workplace

Bullying in the Workplace

Employers have long been aware of laws prohibiting sexual harassment and discrimination and harassment on the basis of sex, race, religion, disability, national origin, and other protected characteristics.  But what about uncivil or intimidating behavior unrelated to protected class status?  Many employees complain to employers about coworkers creating “toxic” work environments, but the offending behavior falls outside of the umbrella of state and federal harassment and discrimination laws.  How should employers handle these situations?

Maine adds Paid-Leave for Any Purpose

Maine adds Paid-Leave for Any Purpose

On Tuesday May 28th, Maine Governor Janet Mills signed into law “An Act Authorizing Employee Leave,” (“the Act”).  This new law will provide eligible employees with the ability to accrue up to 40 hours of paid personal leave per year.  Unlike other paid leave laws around the country, Maine’s will be the first to allow the employees to use the paid leave for any purpose, including non-medical or personal reasons.

Final Pay Laws by State

Final Pay Laws by State

We know that employers have a lot to consider when an employee separates, whether voluntarily or involuntarily. One such consideration is when final payment is due to that employee. As the answer varies from state to state, and from one situation to the next, we’ve compiled the table below to make the determination easier. As always, we encourage you to seek legal counsel with questions and specific factual scenarios.